Feed aggregator

Zombies, Run! 3 Overhauls the Look, Adds New Stories, and More

Lifehacker.com - 1 hour 16 min ago

iOS/Android: Zombies, Run! is one of the more entertaining ways to get into a running routine because it attaches a story to your workout and today the app was updated with even more stuff. That includes a brand new look, a whole new set of stories, and more.

Read more...








'Thermoelectrics' Could One Day Power Cars

Slashdot - 1 hour 34 min ago
sciencehabit writes: "Fossil fuels power modern society by generating heat, but much of that heat is wasted. Researchers have tried to reclaim some of it with semiconductor devices called thermoelectrics, which convert the heat into power. But they remain too inefficient and expensive to be useful beyond a handful of niche applications. Now, scientists in Illinois report that they have used a cheap, well-known material to create the most heat-hungry thermoelectric so far (abstract). In the process, the researchers say, they learned valuable lessons that could push the materials to the efficiencies needed for widespread applications. If that happens, thermoelectrics could one day power cars and scavenge energy from myriad engines, boilers, and electrical plants."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

Show Your Apple Pride with These Wallpapers

Lifehacker.com - 1 hour 46 min ago

Alright Windows guys , move over. It's time for the Apple camp to get some love. Show your affection for your Macbook on your Macbook while you Macbook on your Macbook with these Apple wallpapers.

Read more...








How to Turn Off Facebook's Auto-Playing Video Ads

Lifehacker.com - 2 hours 16 min ago

Facebook recently introduced auto-playing video ads on desktop and mobile, but thankfully there's now a switch to opt out. Here's what you have to do.

Read more...








Survey: 56 Percent of US Developers Expect To Become Millionaires

Slashdot - 2 hours 16 min ago
msmoriarty writes: "According to a recent survey of 1,000 U.S.-based software developers, 56 percent expect to become millionaires in their lifetime. 66 percent also said they expect to get raises in the next year, despite the current state of the economy. Note that some of the other findings of the study (scroll to bulleted list) seem overly positive: 84 percent said they believe they are paid what they're worth, 95 percent report they feel they are 'one of the most valued employees at their organization,' and 80 percent said that 'outsourcing has been a positive factor in the quality of work at their organization.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

Behind the App: The Story of Lookout

Lifehacker.com - 2 hours 46 min ago

Even before the days of iPhones and Androids, the team at Lookout has been protecting smartphones from security flaws and developing tools to deal with stolen phones. We caught up with co-founder and CTO Kevin Mahaffey to learn what led to the founding of the company and the development of the present-day app.

Read more...








Nokia Had a Production-Ready Web Tablet 13 Years Ago

Slashdot - 2 hours 59 min ago
An anonymous reader writes "Here's another story of a tech gadget that arrived before its time. Nokia created a web-ready tablet running EPOC (later to be renamed as Symbian) thirteen years ago. The tablet was set to go into full production, and they actually built a thousand units just before it was canceled. The tablet was scrubbed because market research showed there wasn't demand for the device. The team got devices for themselves and the rest were destroyed. The team was then fired. The lesson: Don't try to be pioneer if you're relying on market research studies."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

A Fantastic Carry-On, Cheap Duct Tape, $150 Chromebook, Roku 2

Lifehacker.com - 3 hours 31 min ago

We've found a couple of good deals on RAVPower external chargers today. The $15 lipstick charger is super-portable, good for about a full phone charge, and normally sells for $20. If you need more capacity, $26 will get you a 10,400 mAh pack today at Newegg as well.

Read more...








Android's Camera Gets a UI Overhaul, New Features, Play Store Release

Lifehacker.com - 3 hours 31 min ago

Android: Google's built-in camera app for Android has been one of the few remaining outliers in the deluge of stock Android apps released on the Play Store . Today that ends, and we get a bunch of new features to boot.

Read more...








Kids Can Swipe a Screen But Can't Use LEGOs

Slashdot - 3 hours 41 min ago
SpankiMonki sends this news from The Guardian: "Children are arriving at nursery school able to 'swipe a screen' but lack the manipulative skills to play with building blocks, teachers have warned. They fear that children are being given tablets to use 'as a replacement for contact time with the parent' and say such habits are hindering progress at school. Addressing the Association of Teachers and Lecturers conference in Manchester on Tuesday, Colin Kinney said excessive use of technology damages concentration and causes behavioural problems such as irritability and a lack of control."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

You Might Be Standing All Wrong. Here's How to Fix Your Imbalance

Lifehacker.com - 3 hours 46 min ago

Standing. It's just something you do, right (like breathing )? The truth is, there's a perfectly aligned and balanced way to stand...and the imbalanced way many of us do.

Read more...








Chrome Remote Desktop Arrives on Android

Lifehacker.com - 3 hours 47 min ago

Android: Google's finally released an Android counterpart to its Chrome-based remote desktop application. Install the Chrome Remote Desktop extension for Chrome and now you can log in to your computer remotely from Android.

Read more...








Read Your Digital Comics on a Kindle

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 16 min ago

Reading comics on your computer or tablet is awesome , but if you'd rather read them on a more eye-friendly screen—like your Kindle—Know Your Mobile has some instructions on how to make that happen.

Read more...








Intel Pushes Into Tablet Market, Pushes Away From Microsoft

Slashdot - 4 hours 23 min ago
jfruh (300774) writes "The Wintel cartel appears to be well and truly dead, as Intel chases after ARM with grim determination into the rapidly growing world of Android tablets. 'Our mix of OSes reflects pretty much what you see in the marketplace,' the company's CEO said, a nice way of saying they see more potential growth from white-box Chinese tablet makers than from Microsoft Surface. Intel managed to ship 5 million tablet chips in the first quarter of the year, although plunging PC sales meant that company profit overall was still down."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

When Will My Phone Get a Software Update?

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 46 min ago

Dear Lifehacker,
I have an [insert Android or iPhone of choice] and I'm still running [some older OS version]. When am I going to get an update to [X new operating system version]?

Read more...








Astronomers Solve Puzzle of the Mountains That Fell From Space

Slashdot - 5 hours 8 min ago
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Iapetus, Saturn's third largest moon, was first photographed by the Cassini spacecraft on 31 December 2004. The images created something of a stir. Clearly visible was a narrow, steep ridge of mountains that stretch almost halfway around the moon's equator. The question that has since puzzled astronomers is how this mountain range got there. Now evidence is mounting that this mountain range is not the result of tectonic or volcanic activity, like mountain ranges on other planets. Instead, astronomers are increasingly convinced that this mountain range fell from space. The latest evidence is a study of the shape of the mountains using 3-D images generated from Cassini data. They show that the angle of the mountainsides is close to the angle of repose, that's the greatest angle that a granular material can form before it landslides. That's not proof but it certainly consistent with this exotic formation theory. So how might this have happened? Astronomers think that early in its life, Iapetus must have been hit by another moon, sending huge volumes of ejecta into orbit. Some of this condensed into a new moon that escaped into space. However, the rest formed an unstable ring that gradually spiraled in towards the moon, eventually depositing the material in a narrow ridge around the equator. Cassini's next encounter with Iapetus will be in 2015 which should give astronomers another chance to study the strangest mountain range in the Solar System."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

Astronomers Solve Puzzle of the Mountains That Fell From Space

Slashdot - 5 hours 8 min ago
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Iapetus, Saturn's third largest moon, was first photographed by the Cassini spacecraft on 31 December 2004. The images created something of a stir. Clearly visible was a narrow, steep ridge of mountains that stretch almost halfway around the moon's equator. The question that has since puzzled astronomers is how this mountain range got there. Now evidence is mounting that this mountain range is not the result of tectonic or volcanic activity, like mountain ranges on other planets. Instead, astronomers are increasingly convinced that this mountain range fell from space. The latest evidence is a study of the shape of the mountains using 3-D images generated from Cassini data. They show that the angle of the mountainsides is close to the angle of repose, that's the greatest angle that a granular material can form before it landslides. That's not proof but it certainly consistent with this exotic formation theory. So how might this have happened? Astronomers think that early in its life, Iapetus must have been hit by another moon, sending huge volumes of ejecta into orbit. Some of this condensed into a new moon that escaped into space. However, the rest formed an unstable ring that gradually spiraled in towards the moon, eventually depositing the material in a narrow ridge around the equator. Cassini's next encounter with Iapetus will be in 2015 which should give astronomers another chance to study the strangest mountain range in the Solar System."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

Astronomers Solve Puzzle of the Mountains That Fell From Space

Slashdot - 5 hours 8 min ago
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Iapetus, Saturn's third largest moon, was first photographed by the Cassini spacecraft on 31 December 2004. The images created something of a stir. Clearly visible was a narrow, steep ridge of mountains that stretch almost halfway around the moon's equator. The question that has since puzzled astronomers is how this mountain range got there. Now evidence is mounting that this mountain range is not the result of tectonic or volcanic activity, like mountain ranges on other planets. Instead, astronomers are increasingly convinced that this mountain range fell from space. The latest evidence is a study of the shape of the mountains using 3-D images generated from Cassini data. They show that the angle of the mountainsides is close to the angle of repose, that's the greatest angle that a granular material can form before it landslides. That's not proof but it certainly consistent with this exotic formation theory. So how might this have happened? Astronomers think that early in its life, Iapetus must have been hit by another moon, sending huge volumes of ejecta into orbit. Some of this condensed into a new moon that escaped into space. However, the rest formed an unstable ring that gradually spiraled in towards the moon, eventually depositing the material in a narrow ridge around the equator. Cassini's next encounter with Iapetus will be in 2015 which should give astronomers another chance to study the strangest mountain range in the Solar System."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology

Astronomers Solve Puzzle of the Mountains That Fell From Space

Slashdot - 5 hours 8 min ago
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Iapetus, Saturn's third largest moon, was first photographed by the Cassini spacecraft on 31 December 2004. The images created something of a stir. Clearly visible was a narrow, steep ridge of mountains that stretch almost halfway around the moon's equator. The question that has since puzzled astronomers is how this mountain range got there. Now evidence is mounting that this mountain range is not the result of tectonic or volcanic activity, like mountain ranges on other planets. Instead, astronomers are increasingly convinced that this mountain range fell from space. The latest evidence is a study of the shape of the mountains using 3-D images generated from Cassini data. They show that the angle of the mountainsides is close to the angle of repose, that's the greatest angle that a granular material can form before it landslides. That's not proof but it certainly consistent with this exotic formation theory. So how might this have happened? Astronomers think that early in its life, Iapetus must have been hit by another moon, sending huge volumes of ejecta into orbit. Some of this condensed into a new moon that escaped into space. However, the rest formed an unstable ring that gradually spiraled in towards the moon, eventually depositing the material in a narrow ridge around the equator. Cassini's next encounter with Iapetus will be in 2015 which should give astronomers another chance to study the strangest mountain range in the Solar System."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology
Syndicate content

Google Analytics Counter