Technology

Uber Revises Privacy Policy, Wants More Data From Users

Slashdot - 2 hours 11 min ago
itwbennett tips news that Uber has amended its privacy policy, making it much simpler to read and understand. But the policy also includes changes to what data Uber collects about its riders. Beginning July 15th, the Uber phone app will keep track of a rider's location while it's running in the background. Uber says riders will be able to opt out of this tracking. The policy changes also allow for advertising using the rider's contact list: "for example the ability to send special offers to riders' friends or family." The revision of Uber's privacy policy followed complaints at the end of last year that the company was overstepping its bounds.

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Categories: Technology

Today's Best Deals: Summer Grilling, Fresh Leftovers, New 3DS XL

Lifehacker.com - 2 hours 49 min ago

Here are the best of today’s deals. Get every great deal every day on Kinja Deals, follow us on Facebook and Twitter to never miss a deal, join us on Kinja Gear to read about great products, and on Kinja Co-Op to help us find the best.

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The Underground Hacking Economy

Slashdot - 2 hours 55 min ago
Fast Company profiles the rise of sites like Hackers List and Hackers For Hire, which provide consolidated markets for people to hire hackers to break passwords, alter databases, learn to operate malware, and more. People with the skills to circumvent security are putting themselves out there as freelancers for specific tasks, and people in need of their services are posting notices asking for help. Law enforcement agencies are warning about this new type of behavior, saying it's often illegal, and facilitated by online anonymity and cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. The number of deals currently being made through these sites remains small, but it's growing — particularly among business seeking to gain an advantage over competitors in other countries.

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Categories: Technology

15 Surprising Things You Can Make in a Rice Cooker

Lifehacker.com - 3 hours 17 sec ago

Despite its name, the rice cooker is not a single-minded kitchen unitasker. Sure, it is the easiest way to make perfect rice, but it’s also a convenient way to cook a wide variety of foods. Here are a few examples that might just convince you to invest in a rice cooker or use yours more often.

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Crowdfunded, Solar-powered Spacecraft Goes Silent

Slashdot - 3 hours 38 min ago
Last week saw the successful launch of the Planetary Society's LightSail spacecraft, the solar-powered satellite that runs Linux and was crowdfunded on Kickstarter. The spacecraft worked flawlessly for two days, but then fell silent, and the engineering team has been working hard on a fix ever since. They've pinpointed the problem: a software glitch. "Every 15 seconds, LightSail transmits a telemetry beacon packet. The software controlling the main system board writes corresponding information to a file called beacon.csv. If you're not familiar with CSV files, you can think of them as simplified spreadsheets—in fact, most can be opened with Microsoft Excel. As more beacons are transmitted, the file grows in size. When it reaches 32 megabytes—roughly the size of ten compressed music files—it can crash the flight system." Unfortunately, the only way to clear that CSV file is to reboot LightSail. It can be done remotely, but as anyone who deals with crashing computers understands, remote commands don't always work. The command has been sent a few dozen times already, but LightSail remains silent. The best hope may now be that the system spontaneously reboots on its own.

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Categories: Technology

PSA: Make Sure You Have a Good Ice Pack in Your Freezer

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 17 sec ago

If you’re spending more time outdoors as the weather warms up, a good ice pack can come in handy, whether you use it to soothe burns or injuries, or just want to keep cool. Now’s the time to put a good one in your freezer, and the Paradice P500 is a great option.

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Hacked Emails Reveal Russian Plans To Obtain Sensitive Western Tech

Slashdot - 4 hours 20 min ago
blando writes: A trove of emails provided to The Intercept detail Russian schemes to obtain a crucial component for military thermal-imaging systems. Though emails about the thermal imaging systems date back as far as 2006, the plans to acquire them began in earnest much more recently, in 2013. To try to hide Russian involvement, a company called Cyclone established a new company in the Republic of Cyprus. They did so with the help of a company called Rayfast, which was owned by three other companies itself. After obfuscating the new company's ownership and military ties, they reached out to several Western companies who worked with the technology.

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Categories: Technology

Use a Takeout Menu as the Contact Photo for a Restaurant

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 30 min ago

Ordering takeout isn’t exactly difficult, but why not make it easier? Take a photo of a menu and make it the restaurant’s contact photo on your phone. Next time you’re craving takeout, you can skip searching for the menu in your junk drawer.

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Lobster Butter: An Awesome Use For Leftover Shells

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 30 min ago

Summer’s unofficially arrived, and with it, lobster season. Next time you splurge on the crustaceans, bear in mind the best way to get all the meat out of them — and don’t throw away those shells, because you can use them to make a fantastic lobster butter.

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How Much to Ask for When You're Negotiating Salary

Lifehacker.com - 5 hours 17 sec ago

Negotiating your salary isn’t easy. And one of the biggest hurdles is knowing how much to ask for. As a general rule of thumb, your number should be 10 to 20 percent more than what you’re earning now.

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Feds Bust a Dark-Web Counterfeit Coupon Kingpin

Slashdot - 5 hours 3 min ago
Sparrowvsrevolution writes: The dark web has become the go-to corner of the Internet to buy drugs, stolen financial data, guns...and counterfeit coupons for Clif bars and condoms? The FBI indicted Beauregard Wattigney yesterday for wire fraud and trademark counterfeiting on digital black market sites Silk Road and Silk Road 2. Wattigney allegedly spoofed coupons for dozens of products and sold collections of them online in exchange for Bitcoin. The FBI accused him of doing $1 million worth of collective damage to the companies he made coupons for, but a fraud consultancy believes the total financial cost of his actions was much higher. Wattigney also offered expensive lessons that taught people how to make their own coupons. "In his tutorials, [he] explained the simple breakdown of barcode creation using the increasingly universal GS1 standard: GS1 codes begin with a 'company prefix' that can be copied from any of the company's products. The next six digits are the 'offer code,' which can be any random number for a counterfeit coupon, followed by the savings amount listed in cents and the required number of item purchases necessary to receive the discount."

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Categories: Technology

Google Smart Lock Saves Your Passwords, Logs In on Chrome and Android

Lifehacker.com - 5 hours 30 min ago

Google already has many features to make it easier to manage the bajillion passwords you have. With an upcoming release of Google Play Services, the company will be introducing a feature called Smart Lock that can store your passwords for third-party services and log into them across devices.

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Dive Into the Friday Open Thread

Lifehacker.com - 5 hours 41 min ago

Hello happy lifehacker readers and random denizens of the kinjaverse (the rickety publishing platform on which this house of cards is built). How are ya’ll doing this week? Any cool projects? Seeking advise on how to deal with the world? Or just how to sort out your kitchen? Find something cool? Interesting? Fun? Share all and random in the comments below.

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Chinese Nationals Accused of Taking SATs For Others

Slashdot - 5 hours 46 min ago
Vadim Makarov writes: Fifteen Chinese nationals living in the U.S. have been charged with creating an elaborate scheme to take U.S. college entrance exams on behalf of students. For the past four years, the accused provided counterfeit Chinese passports to impostors, who sneaked into testing centers where they took the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and others, while claiming to be someone else, according to a federal grand jury indictment. Special Agent in Charge John Kelleghan for Homeland Security Investigations of Philadelphia said: "These students were not only cheating their way into the university, they were also cheating their way through our nation's immigration system."

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Categories: Technology

Create a Hidden Costs Budget to Find What's Draining Your Resources

Lifehacker.com - 6 hours 17 sec ago

Most of us have a budget of the things that we pay for. However, that’s not the same as things that cost us money. If you’re trying to improve your budget, start including a section for the things that cost you in areas like productivity, health, or time.

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DARPA Wants You To Verify Software Flaws By Playing Games

Slashdot - 6 hours 26 min ago
coondoggie writes: Researchers at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) think online gamers can perform the tedious software verification work typically done by professional coding experts. They were so impressed with their first crowdsourced flaw-detecting games, they announced an new round of five games this week designed for improved playability as well as increased software verification effectiveness. “These games translated players’ actions into program annotations and assisted formal verification experts in generating mathematical proofs to verify the absence of important classes of flaws in software written in the C and Java programming languages. An initial analysis indicates that non-experts playing CSFV games generated hundreds of thousands of annotations,” DARPA stated.

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Categories: Technology

Build Towards Inescapable Conclusions to Inspire Like Winston Churchill

Lifehacker.com - 6 hours 30 min ago

Giving a speech is intimidating. Winning over a crowd, even moreso. If you want to inspire the people you’re speaking to when you’re presenting, bring them to an inescapable conclusion.

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Four Myths About Hydration That Refuse To Die

Lifehacker.com - 7 hours 17 sec ago

As Derek Zoolander wisely put it, wetness is the essence of life. Whether you like drinking water or not, it accounts for about 60% of your body weight, and plays a pretty darn important role in making sure your body functions normally. But statistics aside, there are a couple of myths about hydration that refuse to die.

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Australia's Prime Minister Doesn't Get Why Kids Should Learn To Code

Slashdot - 8 hours 32 min ago
New submitter Gob Gob writes: The Prime Minister of Australia has come out and ridiculed an opposition policy aimed at teaching kids to code. In response to the leader of the Labor Party's question about whether he would commit to supporting Labor's push to have coding taught in every primary school in Australia, the Prime Minister said: "He said that he wants primary school kids to be taught coding so they can get the jobs of the future. Does he want to send them all out to work at the age of 11? Is that what he wants to do? Seriously?"

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Categories: Technology
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