Technology

You Don't Have To Be Good At Math To Learn To Code

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 18:23
HughPickens.com writes: Olga Khazan writes in The Atlantic that learning to program involves a lot of Googling, logic, and trial-and-error—but almost nothing beyond fourth-grade arithmetic. Victoria Fine explains how she taught herself how to code despite hating math. Her secret? Lots and lots of Googling. "Like any good Google query, a successful answer depended on asking the right question. "How do I make a website red" was not nearly as successful a question as "CSS color values HEX red" combined with "CSS background color." I spent a lot of time learning to Google like a pro. I carefully learned the vocabulary of HTML so I knew what I was talking about when I asked the Internet for answers." According to Khazan while it's true that some types of code look a little like equations, you don't really have to solve them, just know where they go and what they do. "In most cases you can see that the hard maths (the physical and geometry) is either done by a computer or has been done by someone else. While the calculations do happen and are essential to the successful running of the program, the programmer does not need to know how they are done." Khazan says that in order to figure out what your program should say, you're going to need some basic logic skills and you'll need to be skilled at copying and pasting things from online repositories and tweaking them slightly. "But humanities majors, fresh off writing reams of term papers, are probably more talented at that than math majors are."

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Categories: Technology

Make More Nutritious Salads by Paying Attention to Water Content

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 18:00

If you’re on a diet or just trying to eat healthier, salads are likely a staple of your meal plan. While they’re great for filling you up with fiber, to create truly nutritious salads you should also consider the water content of each ingredient.

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Second Gen Moto 360 Men's and Women's, Fitness-Oriented Moto 360 Sport Unveiled

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 17:39
MojoKid writes: Motorola's first generation Moto 360 smartwatch was one of the first Android Wear smartwatches to hit the market, and because of its round display, became the immediate flag bearer for the Android Wear platform. As new competition has entered the fray — including entries from Apple with the Apple Watch and Samsung with the Gear S2 — Motorola is announcing a second generation smartwatch that solves most of the complaints of the previous model. Motorola has ditched the archaic Texas Instruments OMAP 3 processor in the original Moto 360. The new second generation Moto 360 brings a more credible 1.2GHz, quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor and Adreno 305 graphics to the table. You'll also find 512MB of RAM and 4GB of storage. And if you didn't like the largish dimensions of the previous Moto 360, you'll be glad to know that Motorola is offering two sizes this time around. There's a 46mm diameter case that comes with a 360x330 display and a smaller 42mm diameter case that houses a 360x325 display. Motorola has also introduced a dedicated women's model of the Moto 360 which features a 42mm diameter case and accepts smaller 16mm bands. As for battery life, Motorola says that the men's and women's 42mm models comes with a 300 mAh battery which is good for up to 1.5 days of mixed use, while the 46mm watch comes with a larger 400 mAh battery which is good for up to 2 days on charge.

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Categories: Technology

Fight Off Secondhand Stress From Your Colleagues With a "Power Lead"

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 17:00

Stress can be spread to other people , just like an infection. If you find that your colleagues are always spreading their stress to you, you might be able to prevent it next time by opening your conversation with a positive comment.

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Netflix Open Sources Sleepy Puppy XSS Hunter

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 16:54
msm1267 writes: Netflix has released a tool it calls Sleepy Puppy. The tool injects cross-site scripting payloads into a target app that may not be vulnerable, but could be stored in a database and tracks the payload if it's reflected to a secondary application that makes use of the data in the same field. "We were looking for a way to provide coverage on applications that come from different origins or may not be publicly accessible," said co-developer Scott Behrens, a senior application security engineer at Netflix. "We also wanted to observe where stored data gets reflected back, and how data that may be stored publicly could also be reflected in a large number of internal applications." Sleepy Puppy is available on Netflix's Github repository and is one of a slew of security tools its engineers have released to open source.

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Categories: Technology

Be Ready for Anything In the Wilderness With This DIY Survival Watch

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 16:30

It’s always good to be prepared when you’re trekking out into the wilderness, but survival gear can take up all of your space that’s better served for tasty things like sandwiches. This custom five-in-one survival watch has you covered.

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Why Do So Many Tech Workers Dislike Their Jobs?

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 16:10
Nerval's Lobster writes: So what if you work for a tech company that offers free lunch, in-house gym, and dry cleaning? A new survey suggests that a majority of software engineers, developers, and sysadmins are miserable. Granted, the survey in question only involved 5,000 respondents, so it shouldn't be viewed as comprehensive (it was also conducted by a company that deals in employee engagement), but it's nonetheless insightful into the reasons why a lot of tech pros apparently dislike their jobs. Apparently perks don't matter quite so much if your employees have no sense of mission, don't have a clear sense of how they can get promoted, and don't interact with their co-workers very well. While that should be glaringly obvious, a lot of companies are still fixated on the idea that minor perks will apparently translate into huge morale boosts; but free smoothies in the cafeteria only goes so far.

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Categories: Technology

Fix a Warped Wood Cutting Board With a Damp Cloth and an Iron

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 15:30

Wood cutting boards can easily warp if you let too much moisture get to them for extended periods of time. Fortunately, you can fix it by warping it back with a couple household items.

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How Open Film Project "Cosmos Laundromat" Made Blender Better

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 15:26
An anonymous reader writes: At the beginning of August the Blender Institute released Cosmos Laundromat: First Cycle, its seventh open project. More than just a 10-minute short film, Cosmos Laundromat is the Blender Institute's most ambitious project, a pilot for the first fully free and open animated feature film. In his article on Opensource.com animator and open source advocate Jason van Gumster highlights the film project and takes a look at some of its most significant contributions to the Blender open source project.

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Categories: Technology

Top 10 Ways to Break Into and Out of Almost Anything

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 15:05

Breaking into an electronic safe may seem nefarious...unless it’s your own safe and you forgot the combination. Sometimes, you need to do a little evil to do a little good. Today, as part of Lifehacker’s 10th anniversary celebration , we’re showing you how to break into (and out of) almost anything.

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Build a Smartphone-Controlled Garage Door Opener

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 15:00

If you have an older garage door, you probably have a bunch of obnoxious large remotes sitting around. If you’re prefer something a bit more sleek (and secure ), Make shows you how to build a garage door opener you can control with your smartphone.

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Mutt 1.5.24 Released

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 15:00
kthreadd writes: Version 1.5.24 of the Mutt email client has been released. New features in this release includes among other things terminal status-line (TS) support, a new color object 'prompt', the ability to encrypt postponed messages and opportunistic encryption which automatically enables/disables encryption based on message recipients. SSLv3 is now also disabled by default.

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Categories: Technology

Can Living In Total Darkness For 5 Days "Reset" the Visual System?

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 14:41
the_newsbeagle writes: That's what one neuroscientist is aiming to find out. He wants to put patients with a type of amblyopia, the vision problem commonly called lazy eye, into the dark for 5 days. His hypothesis: When they emerge, their brains' visual cortices will be temporarily "plastic" and changeable, and may begin to process the visual signals from their bad eyes correctly. Before he could do this study, though, he had to do a test run to figure out logistics. So he himself lived in a pitch black room for 5 days. One finding: Eating ravioli in the dark is hard.

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Categories: Technology

School Nurses Are Bad At Diagnosing Head Lice

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 14:30

If a school nurse says your kid has head lice, they’re probably wrong—and if you got the news from a doctor, be even more suspicious. Head scratching and white dots in the hair are usually not lice—but they’re mistaken for lice more often than you’d think.

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Google Docs Adds an In-App Research Mode, Dictation, and More

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 14:00

Google Docs is rolling out a slew of updates today, including a new research mode for the Android app, voice typing in Chrome, and more.

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China Preparing To Send Crewed Shenzhou 11 To Tiangong 2 Space Station In 2016

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 13:57
MarkWhittington writes: China has not sent people into space since the mission of the Shenzhou 10 to the prototype space station Tiangong 1 in June 2013. Since then the Chinese have accomplished the landing of the Chang'e 3 on the lunar surface. According to a story in Space Daily, the hiatus in Chinese crewed spaceflight is about to end with the launch of the Tiangong-2 prototype space station in 2016 with the subsequent visit by a crew of Chinese astronauts on board the Shenzhou 11. The mission will be a prelude to the construction of a larger Chinese space station, slated to be completed by 2022.

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Categories: Technology

How to Do Your Own Yearly Home Inspection

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 13:30

Before you buy a home, it’s always a good idea to get a professional home inspector—but that shouldn’t be the only time you give your home a thorough look. Here’s a checklist of what to look for when performing a yearly visual inspection on your own home, or one you are considering buying.

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Hacking Medical Mannequins

Slashdot - Wed, 2015-09-02 13:14
An anonymous reader writes: A team of researchers at the University of South Alabama is investigating potential breaches of medical devices used in training, taking the mannequin iStan as its prime target in its scenario-based research. Identifying the network security solution and network protocol as the vulnerable components, the team was able to carry out brute force attacks against the router PIN, and denial of service (DDoS) attacks, using open source tools such as BackTrack.

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Categories: Technology

Gluru Shows You Files, Emails, and More Right When You Need Them 

Lifehacker.com - Wed, 2015-09-02 13:00

Web/Android/iOS (Coming Soon): One of the best things about Google Now is that it floats useful information right when you need it. Gluru is a new app and web service that wants to do the same, just for your productive life, by pulling from Dropbox, Google Drive, Evernote, Google Calendar, and more.

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