Technology

Turning a Smartphone Display Into a Biometric Scanner

Slashdot - 6 hours 6 min ago
New submitter jan_jes writes: Recent mobile phones integrate fingerprint scanners to authenticate users biometrically and replace passwords, making authentication more convenient. Researchers at Yahoo Labs have created a new technology called "Bodyprint," which turns your smartphone's touchscreen display into a biometric scanner. It allows the touch sensor to scan users' body parts (PDF) such as ears, fingers, fists, and palms by pressing them against the display. Bodyprint implements the four-eye principle for locking sensitive documents — accessing the document can require the presence of two or more people involved with the project. Another application is authenticating a user to answer a call by scanning their ear pressed against the phone.

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Categories: Technology

Top 10 Mistakes We Make When Grocery Shopping (And How to Fix Them)

Lifehacker.com - 6 hours 42 min ago

Buying groceries is one of those universal chores most of us could probably do better at, whether it’s saving money on food or spending less time shopping . Here are ten common mistakes we tend to make at the grocery store—and how to avoid them.

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Microsoft Increases Android Patent Licensing Reach

Slashdot - 7 hours 13 min ago
BrianFagioli writes: Microsoft may not be winning in the mobile arena, but they're still making tons of money from those who are. Patent licensing agreements net the company billions each year from device makers like Samsung, Foxconn, and ZTE. Now, Microsoft has added another company to that list: Qisda Corp. They make a number of Android and Chrome-based devices under the Qisda brand and the BenQ brand, and now Microsoft will be making money off those, too.

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Categories: Technology

Today's Best Deals: Shower-Proof Bluetooth Speaker, $1 Books, & More

Lifehacker.com - 7 hours 38 min ago

$30 Bluetooth speaker deals aren’t all that rare, but not many of them will hold up very well in the shower. The Mpow Armor can do just that with its IP65-certified splash-proof rating, meaning you can spend your showers singing along with Spotify, or quietly contemplating your favorite podcasts. [Mpow Armor Splashproof Portable Bluetooth Speaker, $30 with code TEQ279VG]

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This Chart Helps Kids Learn to Eat More Vegetables

Lifehacker.com - 7 hours 42 min ago

Many kids (and adults) can do a better job of eating a wider variety of vegetables. Whether you’re raising a picky eater or just want to encourage a love for veggies, this table is a fun resource.

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7.8 Earthquake Rocks Nepal, Hundreds Dead

Slashdot - 8 hours 17 min ago
An anonymous reader writes: Nepal was struck by an earthquake of magnitude 7.8 today, with an epicenter 80 km east of the country's second biggest city, Pokhara. Its effects were also strongly felt in the capital, Kathmandu. Casualty reports conflict, but authorities have indicated at least 500 are dead and many more are feared to be trapped. Nepal has declared a state of emergency for the affected areas, and asked for international humanitarian assistance. India and Pakistan have both offered help. Some Indian cities were affected by the earthquake as well, and there are reports of avalanches on Mt. Everest, which has many climbers at any given time.

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Categories: Technology

Tesla To Announce Battery-Based Energy Storage For Homes

Slashdot - 9 hours 19 min ago
Okian Warrior writes: Billionaire Elon Musk will announce next week that Tesla will begin offering battery-based energy storage for residential and commercial customers. The batteries power up overnight when energy companies typically charge less for electricity, then are used during the day to power a home. In a pilot project, Tesla has already begun offering home batteries to SolarCity (SCTY) customers, a solar power company for which Musk serves as chairman. Currently 330 U.S. households are running on Tesla's batteries in California. The batteries start at about $13,000, though California's Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PCG) offers customers a 50% rebate. The batteries are three-feet high by 2.5-feet wide, and need to be installed at least a foot and a half off the ground. They can be controlled with a Web app and a smartphone app.

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Categories: Technology

Mystery of the Coldest Spot In the CMB Solved

Slashdot - 12 hours 20 min ago
StartsWithABang writes: The cosmic microwave background is a thing of beauty, as not only does its uniform, cold temperature reveal a hot, dense past that began with the hot Big Bang, but its fluctuations reveal a pattern of overdensities and underdensities in the very early stages of the Universe. It's fluctuations just like these that give rise to the stars, galaxies, groups and clusters that exist today, as well as the voids in the vast cosmic web. But effects at the surface of last scattering are not the only ones that affect the CMB's temperature; if we want to make sure we've got an accurate map of what the Universe was born with, we have to take everything into account, including the effects of matter as it gravitationally grows and shrinks. As we do exactly this, we find ourselves discovering the causes behind the biggest anomalies in the sky, and it turns out that the standard cosmological model can explain it all.

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Categories: Technology

Pirate Bay Blockade Censors CloudFlare Customers

Slashdot - Sat, 2015-04-25 01:29
An anonymous reader writes: The blockade of the Pirate Bay by UK ISPs is causing trouble for CloudFlare customers. Several websites have been inadvertently blocked by Sky because a Pirate Bay proxy is hosted behind the same IP-addresses. In a response, CloudFlare threatened to disconnect the proxy site from its network. Like any form of censorship web blockades can sometime lead to overblocking, targeting perfectly legitimate websites by mistake. This is also happening in the UK where Sky's blocking technology is inadvertently blocking sites that have nothing to do with piracy.

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Categories: Technology

Microsoft Opens Vulnerability Bounty Program For Spartan Browser

Slashdot - Fri, 2015-04-24 22:27
jones_supa writes: As it did in the past when it tried to make Internet Explorer more secure, Microsoft has launched a new bug bounty program for Spartan browser, the default application of Windows 10 for surfing the information highway. A typical remote code execution flaw can bring between $1,500 and $15,000, and for the top payment you also need to provide a functioning exploit. The company says that it could pay even more than that, if you convince the jury on the entry quality and complexity. Sandbox escape vulnerabilities with Enhanced Protected Mode enabled, important or higher severity vulnerabilities in Spartan or its engine, and ASLR info disclosure vulnerabilities are also eligible. If you want to accept the challenge, Microsoft provides more information on how to participate.

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Categories: Technology

Buggy Win 95 Code Almost Wrecked Stuxnet Campaign

Slashdot - Fri, 2015-04-24 19:25
mask.of.sanity writes: Super-worm Stuxnet could have blown its cover and failed its sabotage mission due to a bug that allowed it to spread to ancient Windows boxes, malware analysts say. Stuxnet was on the brink of failure thanks to buggy code allowing it to spread to PCs running older and unsupported versions of Windows, and probably causing them to crash as a result. Those blue screens of death would have raised suspicions at the Natanz nuclear lab.

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Categories: Technology

How to Turn Your Tablet into a Productivity-Boosting Second Screen

Lifehacker.com - Fri, 2015-04-24 19:00

Tablets are great entertainment devices, but they aren’t always as useful for getting things done. If you want your tablet to be more than just a fun little toy, it’s really just a matter of the right apps, attitude, and configuration. Here’s how you can turn your tablet into a handy, productivity-boosting tool.

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Allegation: Philly Cops Leaned Suspect Over Balcony To Obtain Password

Slashdot - Fri, 2015-04-24 18:30
An anonymous reader writes with this news from Ars Technica: If you want access to encrypted data on a drug dealer's digital device, you might try to break the crypto—or you might just try to break the man. According to testimony from a police corruption trial currently roiling the city of Philadelphia, officers from an undercover drug squad took the latter route back in November 2007. After arresting their suspect, Michael Cascioli, in the hallway outside his 18th floor apartment, the officers took Cascioli back inside. Although they lacked a search warrant, the cops searched Cascioli's rooms anyway. According to a federal indictment (PDF), the officers 'repeatedly assaulted and threatened [Cascioli] during the search to obtain information about the location of money, drugs, and drug suppliers.' That included, according to Cascioli, lifting him over the edge of his balcony to try to frighten out of him the password to his Palm Pilot. That sounds like a good time for a duress password.

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Categories: Technology

This Video Explains the Important Benefits of a Proper Fighting Stance

Lifehacker.com - Fri, 2015-04-24 18:00

While fighting should be avoided at all costs, everyone should know a little self-dense in case of emergency. This video explains what proper fighting stance should look like and why it’s half the battle.

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Patents Show Google Fi Was Envisioned Before the iPhone Was Released

Slashdot - Fri, 2015-04-24 17:47
smaxp writes: Contrary to reports, Google didn't become a mobile carrier with the introduction of Google Fi. Google Fi was launched to prove that a network-of-networks serves smartphone users better than a single mobile carrier's network. Patents related to Google Fi, filed in early 2007, explain Google's vision – smartphones negotiate for and connect to the fastest network available. The patent and Google Fi share a common notion that the smartphone should connect to the fastest network available, not a single carrier's network that may not provide the best performance. It breaks the exclusive relationship between a smartphone and a single carrier. Meanwhile, a story at BostInno points out that Google's not the only one with a network-hopping hybrid approach to phone calls.

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Categories: Technology

Bees Prefer Nectar Laced With Neonicotinoids

Slashdot - Fri, 2015-04-24 17:06
Taco Cowboy writes: Neonicotinoids are a class of neuro-active insecticides chemically similar to nicotine. Neonicotinoids kill insects by overwhelming and short-circuiting their central nervous systems (PDF). Shell and Bayer started the development of neonicotinoids back in the 1980s and 1990s. Since this new group of pesticides came to market, the bee population has been devastated in regions where they have been widely used. Studies from 2012 linked neonicotinoid use to crashing bee populations. New studies, however, have discovered that bees prefer nectar laced with neonicotinoids over nectar free of any trace of neonicotinoids. According to researchers at Newcastle University, the bees may "get a buzz" from the nicotine-like chemicals in the same way smokers crave cigarettes.

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Categories: Technology

Start Overcoming Your Shyness by Dumping Your Self-Image

Lifehacker.com - Fri, 2015-04-24 17:00

Being shy isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but if you’d like to overcome it, you have to start by ditching the labels and stigmas you’ve attached to yourself.

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Create Multiple Libraries in Photos with a Keyboard Shortcut

Lifehacker.com - Fri, 2015-04-24 16:30

Setting up and using Apple’s new Photos app is easy enough , but one thing you might not notice immediately is the ability to keep multiple libraries on your computer. Cult of Mac points to a keyboard shortcut that makes it easy to swap between libraries.

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Github DDoS Attack As Seen By Google

Slashdot - Fri, 2015-04-24 16:24
New submitter opensec writes: Last month GitHub was hit by a massive DDoS attack originating from China. On this occasion the public discovered that the NSA was not the only one with a QUANTUM-like capability. China has its own "Great Cannon" that can inject malicious JavaScript inside HTTP traffic. That weapon was used in the GitHub attack. People using Baidu services were unwitting participants in the denial of service, their bandwidth used to flood the website. But such a massive subversion of the Internet could not evade Google's watchful eye. Niels Provos, engineer at Google, tells us how it happened. Showing that such attacks cannot be made covertly, Provos hopes that the public shaming will act as a deterrent.

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Categories: Technology

How Video Games Taught Me Personal Accountability

Lifehacker.com - Fri, 2015-04-24 16:00

Blame, procrastination, self-victimization—this terrible trifecta can sink your career and limit your levels of personal success. We often find ourselves resorting to bad patterns, especially in the workplace. I have noticed one place in my own life where these traits are nowhere to be seen. While I play video games.

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