Technology

The Library Studio Workspace

Lifehacker.com - 3 hours 10 min ago

We love minimal workspaces, but there’s something about these home office setups that look and feel more like a study than anything else that’s also really attractive. Redditor Formulabuild built this home office with a library on one side and all of his instruments on the other. Here are some more photos.

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Pastejacking Attack Appends Malicious Terminal Commands To Your Clipboard

Slashdot - 3 hours 30 min ago
An anonymous reader writes: "It has been possible for a long time for developers to use CSS to append malicious content to the clipboard without a user noticing and thus fool them into executing unwanted terminal commands," writes Softpedia. "This type of attack is known as clipboard hijacking, and in most scenarios, is useless, except when the user copies something inside their terminal." Security researcher Dylan Ayrey published a new version of this attack last week, which uses only JavaScript as the attack medium, giving the attack more versatility and making it now easier to carry out. The attack is called Pastejacking and it uses Javascript to theoretically allow attackers to add their malicious code to the entire page to run commands behind a user's back when they paste anything inside the console. "The attack can be deadly if combined with tech support or phishing emails," writes Softpedia. "Users might think they're copying innocent text into their console, but in fact, they're running the crook's exploit for them."

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Categories: Technology

Five Surprising First Date Deal Breakers

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 10 min ago

All kinds of things can go wrong on a first date , but not every pitfall is as obvious as you think. According to one survey of over 1,300 singles, you should try to avoid these lesser-known deal breakers as well.

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Elderly Use More Secure Passwords Than Millennials, Says Report

Slashdot - 4 hours 13 min ago
An anonymous reader writes from a report via Quartz: A report released May 24 by Gigya surveyed 4,000 adults in the U.S. and U.K. and found that 18- to 34-year-olds are more likely to use bad passwords and report their online accounts being compromised. The majority of respondents ages 51 to 69 say they completely steer away from easily cracked passwords like "password," "1234," or birthdays, while two-thirds of those in the 18-to-34 age bracket were caught using those kind of terms. Quartz writes, "The diligence of the older group could help explain why 82% of respondents in this age range did not report having had any of their online accounts compromised in the past year. In contrast, 35% of respondents between 18 and 34 said at least one of their accounts was hacked within the last 12 months, twice the rate of those aged 51 to 69."

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Remains of the Day: Twitter Eases the 140-Character Limit

Lifehacker.com - 4 hours 40 min ago

The rules of Twitter are rife with minutiae that can be difficult to grok for those unfamiliar, and in an endless effort to attract new users, Twitter is making a few changes. You’ll soon notice that images and media no longer count towards the character limit and replies will be handled a little differently.

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Microsoft Awards Grants To Deliver Affordable Internet Access

Slashdot - 4 hours 57 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNET: Microsoft said Tuesday it had awarded grants to 12 businesses as part of the company's Affordable Access Initiative, part of the software giant's effort to encourage low-cost Internet around the world. Grant recipients include businesses from Argentina, Botswana, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Nigeria, Philippines, Rwanda, Uganda, the UK and the US. In addition to financial support, each company will have access to Microsoft resources, software and services to help them develop their technology. "With more than half of the world's population lacking access to the Internet, connectivity is a global challenge that demands creative problem solving," Peggy Johnson, executive vice president of business development, said in a press release. "By using technology that's available now and partnering with local entrepreneurs who understand the needs of their communities, our hope is to create sustainable solutions that will not only have impact today but also in the years to come." Google and Facebook are also working on bringing affordable Internet access around the world. Google has plans to broadcast Internet from hot air balloons via Project Loon, while Facebook plans to beam Internet down to earth from drones.

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Find the Right Size Watch for Your Wrist With These Tips

Lifehacker.com - 5 hours 10 min ago

Watches come in a wide variety of sizes, and so do wrists. These helpful tips will make sure your never buy a watch that looks too big or too small when you wear it.

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Three Different Ways to Slice a Scallion, Depending on What You're Cooking

Lifehacker.com - 5 hours 40 min ago

Scallions are delicious in lots of things, but getting the best flavor and presentation from them demands you learn to slice them a little differently depending on what you’re making. This video, posted to Instagram by Food52, shows you three different slicing methods, and the dishes each is best for.

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Google France Being Raided For Unpaid Taxes

Slashdot - 5 hours 40 min ago
jones_supa writes: Investigators in France have raided Google's Paris headquarters amid a probe over the company's tax payments, Reuters reports. The French Finance Ministry is investigating $1.8 billion in back taxes. According to a report in French daily Le Parisien, at least 100 investigators are part of the raid at Google's offices. A source close to the finance ministry said that the raid at Google's offices has been ongoing on Tuesday since 03:00 GMT. In February, a source at the French Finance Ministry told Reuters that the government was seeking the $1.8 billion from Google. At the time, official spokespeople for Google France and the Finance Ministry refused to comment on the situation. Google could face up to a $11.14 million fine if it is found guilty, or a fine of half of the value of the laundered amount involved. In April, the EU revealed plans to force multinationals such as Google, Amazon and Facebook to disclose exactly where and how much tax they pay across the continent. A new clause was added since the Panama Papers leak requiring the companies to report how much money they make in so-called "tax havens."

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How to Shop Quicker, Easier, and Cheaper at the Supermarket

Lifehacker.com - 6 hours 10 min ago

We all have different methods for shopping. The way most of us shop however—slowly dragging a cart round, maybe taking a rough list—provides many benefits for the supermarket while offering very few to the shopper.

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Google Now Handles At Least 2 Trillion Searches Per Year

Slashdot - 6 hours 25 min ago
Danny Sullivan, reporting for Search Engine Land: How many searches per year happen on Google? After nearly four years, the company has finally released an updated figure today of "trillions" per year. How many trillions, exactly, Google wouldn't say. Consider two trillion the starting point. Google did confirm to Search Engine Land that because it said it handles "trillions" of searches per year worldwide, the figure could be safely assumed to be two trillion or above. Is it more than two trillion? Google could be doing five trillion searches per year. Or 10 trillion. Or 100 trillion. Or presumably up to 999 trillion, because if it were 1,000 trillion, you'd expect Google would announce that it does a quadrillion searches per year.

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Comixology Launches a "Netflix for Comics" Subscription Service

Lifehacker.com - 6 hours 40 min ago

Comixology, the digital comic reading app, has launched an all-you-can-read, Netflix-style subscription service for $5.99 a month.

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American Scientists Working On Creating Chimeras: Half-Human, Half-Animal Embryos

Slashdot - 6 hours 55 min ago
Researchers at the University of California, Davis are working on creating half-human, half-animal hybrid embryos dubbed chimeras to better understand diseases and its progression. But not everybody is thrilled about it. IBTimes reports: One of the aims of the experiment using chimeras is to create farm animals with human organs. The body parts could then be harvested and transplanted into very sick people. However, a number of bioethicists and scientists frown on the creation of interspecies embryos which they believe crosses the line. New York Medical College Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy Stuart Newman calls the use of chimeras as entering unsettling ground which damages "our sense of humanity." They are not alone in voicing their opinion against the idea. Huffington Post adds: The project is so controversial that the National Institutes of Health has refused to fund it. The researchers are relying on private donors. Critics of these experiments say they are too risky because there is no way of knowing where the human stem cells will go. Will they just become a pancreas? Or could they become a brain? And if they become a brain, will the pigs who house them have human consciousness?

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Categories: Technology

Bake the Easiest Cupcakes Ever with This Two-Ingredient Recipe

Lifehacker.com - 7 hours 10 min ago

After overdosing on two-ingredient chocolate mousse , we wanted something else to satisfy our sweet tooth that was as quick and easy. The internet smiled upon us as the One Pot Chef shared his delicious two-ingredient cupcake recipe.

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No, Apple Won't Become a Wireless Carrier

Slashdot - 7 hours 25 min ago
Don Reisinger, reporting for Fortune: Apple won't be competing with its carrier partners anytime soon. Speaking at Startup Fest Europe in Amsterdam during an interview on Tuesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook squashed rumors that his company is planning to eventually get into the cellular market to compete with the likes of AT&T and Verizon. "Our expertise doesn't extend to the network," Cook said. "We've worked with AT&T in the U.S., O2 in the U.K., as well as T-Mobile and Orange, and we expanded as we learned more. But generally, the things Apple likes to do, are things we can do globally. We don't have the network skill. We'll do some things along the way with e-SIMs along the way, but in general, I like the things carriers do."

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Categories: Technology

Here's the Best Time and Length to Schedule a Job Interview

Lifehacker.com - 7 hours 40 min ago

The time of day your job interview is scheduled can impact your chances of an offer, according to a new survey of over 2,200 CFOs from various companies. Mornings are the best time, most agreed, and you have a short window to make a good impression.

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Beware Of Keystroke Loggers Disguised As USB Phone Chargers, FBI Warns

Slashdot - 7 hours 55 min ago
An anonymous reader cites an article on Ars Technica: FBI officials are warning private industry partners to be on the lookout for highly stealthy keystroke loggers that surreptitiously sniff passwords and other input typed into wireless keyboards. The FBI's Private Industry Notification (PDF) comes more than 15 months after whitehat hacker Samy Kamkar released a KeySweeper, a proof-of-concept attack platform that covertly logged and decrypted keystrokes from many Microsoft-branded wireless keyboards and transmitted the data over cellular networks. To lower the chances that the sniffing device might be discovered by a target, Kamkar designed it to look almost identical to USB phone chargers that are nearly ubiquitous in homes and offices."If placed strategically in an office or other location where individuals might use wireless devices, a malicious cyber actor could potentially harvest personally identifiable information, intellectual property, trade secrets, passwords, or other sensitive information," FBI officials wrote in last month's advisory. "Since the data is intercepted prior to reaching the CPU, security managers may not have insight into how sensitive information is being stolen."

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The Ideal Sitting Posture and Workspace Setup for Healthy Desk Workers

Lifehacker.com - 8 hours 40 min ago

By now, everyone knows that sitting all day is damaging your body , so it’s important to move around and stay active. But how you sit between those breaks is just as important. Physiotherapist Joanne Gough has a quick video outlining the ideal sitting posture and how to set up your workspace accordingly.

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Too Fat For Facebook: Photo Banned For Depicting Body In 'Undesirable Manner'

Slashdot - 8 hours 40 min ago
An anonymous reader shares a report on The Guardian: Facebook has apologized for banning a photo of a plus-sized model and telling the feminist group that posted the image that it depicts "body parts in an undesirable manner". Cherchez la Femme, an Australian group that hosts popular culture talkshows with "an unapologetically feminist angle", said Facebook rejected an advert featuring Tess Holliday, a plus-sized model wearing a bikini, telling the group it violated the company's "ad guidelines". After the group appealed against the rejection, Facebook's ad team initially defended the decision, writing that the photo failed to comply with the social networking site's "health and fitness policy". "Ads may not depict a state of health or body weight as being perfect or extremely undesirable," Facebook wrote. "Ads like these are not allowed since they make viewers feel bad about themselves. Instead, we recommend using an image of a relevant activity, such as running or riding a bike." In a statement on Monday, Facebook apologized for its original stance and said it had determined that the photo does comply with its guidelines.Facebook said that its team scans millions of ad images every week, and sometimes understandably misses out on a few.

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